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Jubilees

50 years

Father George Zeck

Father George Zeck was ordained to the priesthood at St. Cecilia in Nashwauk by Bishop Paul Anderson on June 5, 1970. Father Zeck attended Nashwauk High School. He also attended Hibbing Junior College, Mt. St. Paul in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and St. Paul Seminary.

During Father Zeck’s ministry, he has served Sacred Heart, Duluth; St. Joseph, Grand Rapids; Good Shepherd, Duluth; St. James, Duluth; Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Cloquet; St. Joseph, Crosby; St. Joseph, Deerwood; Holy Spirit, Two Harbors; St. Alice, Pequot Lakes; St. Christopher, Nisswa; and Our Lady of Lourdes, Pine River.

He has also served as Newman chaplain at Itasca Junior College, chaplain for the Air National Guard, auxiliary chaplain for the Duluth Air Base, vocations director, auditor in the marriage tribunal, and on the Presbyteral Council.

Father Zeck retired in 2013.

Father Michael Lyons

Father Michael Lyons, a native of Louisburgh, County Mayo, Ireland, was ordained to the priesthood for the Diocese of Duluth June 14, 1970. He attended high school at Sancta Maria in Louisburgh, and college at St. Jarlath’s, Tuam, and St. Patrick’s, Maynooth. He also attended All Hallows Seminary in Dublin.

During Father Lyons’ ministry, he served St. Francis, Brainerd; St. Leo, Hibbing; St. John the Evangelist, Duluth; Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth; St. Raphael, Duluth; Immaculate Conception, Pine City; Holy Spirit, Two Harbors; and St. Mary, Silver Bay. He also served as a researcher for diocesan planning, as director of the Office of Planning, as director of the Office of Communications, and on the diocesan Presbyteral Council.

Father Lyons retired in 2015.

Father Dennis Hoffman

Father Dennis Hoffman was ordained to the priesthood at St. Rose in Proctor by Bishop Paul Anderson June 13, 1970. He attended Proctor High School and Mt. St. Paul in Waukesha, Wisconsin. He also attended St. Paul Seminary.

During Father Hoffman’s ministry, he served St. Anthony, Ely; Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Cloquet; St. Cecilia, Nashwauk; St. Mary Star of the Sea, Sacred Heart, St. Peter and Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth; Immaculate Heart, Crosslake; Our Lady of Lourdes, Pine River; St. Kevin, Pengilly; St. Mary, Keewatin; Immaculate Mary, Coleraine; St. Mary, Marble; and St. Joseph, Taconite. He also served on the diocesan personnel board, moderator of the CCW, dean of the Duluth and Virginia deaneries, and with the NCDVD in Chicago.

Father Hoffman retired in 2014.

25 years

Father Anthony Wroblewski

Father Anthony Wroblewski was ordained to the priesthood at St. Casimir’s Church in St. Paul by Oblate Bishop Roger Schwietz for the Oblates of Mary Immaculate on June 10, 1995. He was incardinated in the Diocese of Duluth on July 2, 2007.

During Father Wroblewski’s ministry in the Diocese of Duluth, he has served Holy Family, Duluth; St. Francis, Brainerd; St. Andrew, Brainerd; St. Mathias, Ft. Ripley; All Saints, Baxter; St. Thomas of the Pines, Brainerd; Holy Family, McGregor; and Our Lady of Fatima, McGrath. He has been assigned as administrator for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Rosary and St. Mary Star of the Sea in Duluth beginning this month. He has also served on the Presbyteral Council, the Human Life and Development Fund, as moderator for the DCCW, as dean of the Brainerd Deanery, and continues to serve as a consultor.

Local news in brief

Camp Survive canceled

In early June, organizers from the Diocese of Duluth announced that this year’s Camp Survive has been canceled, due to the fact that the state of Minnesota had not yet given permission for camps to reopen their facilities for overnight camps. Prayer team and junior counselor applicants were being notified.

Father Bock celebrates ordination anniversary

Father Jeremy Bock celebrated the third anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood during the weekly Blessed Sacrament Parish staff meeting June 9. The celebration was limited to staff only in order to maintain social distancing and gathering capacity. Gloves, tongs, and sanitizer were used for the safe distribution of treats.

St. Raphael Knights serve parish, community

The Knights of Columbus Council No. 6791 awarded Bryton Kukowski from St. Raphael Church the 2020-21 Student Scholarship. Kukowski is planning a career in psychology and pre-occupational therapy at the University of Wisconsin-Superior. The council also worked on flower bed weeding and cleaned up the grounds around St. Raphael’s parish, had members scrape and restain the St. Raphael’s Parish sign at the corner of Midway and Seville Road, and organized a yard clean-up at a Senior KC member’s house. On June 9, the council received the Colombian Award.

Martin Luther King and the Religious Motivation for Social Change

A principal reason why the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s was so successful both morally and practically was that it was led largely by people with a strong religious sensibility. The most notable of these leaders was, of course, Martin Luther King. To appreciate the subtle play between King’s religious commitment and his practical work, I would draw your attention to two texts—namely, his Letter from the Birmingham City Jail and his “I Have a Dream” speech, both from 1963. While imprisoned in Birmingham for leading a nonviolent protest, King responded to certain of his fellow Christian ministers who had criticized him for going too fast, expecting social change to happen overnight. The Baptist minister answered his critics in a perhaps surprising manner, invoking the aid of a medieval Catholic theologian. King drew their attention to the reflections of St. Thomas Aquinas on law, specifically Thomas’ theory…

Martín Luther King y la motivación religiosa para el cambio social

Una de las principales razones por las que el movimiento de los derechos civiles de las décadas de 1950 y 1960 tuvo tanto éxito, tanto en el plano moral como en el práctico, fue que estuvo dirigido en gran medida por personas con una fuerte sensibilidad religiosa. El más notable de estos líderes fue, por supuesto, Martín Luther King. Para apreciar el sutil juego entre el compromiso religioso de King y su trabajo práctico, me gustaría llamar su atención sobre dos textos, a saber, su Carta desde la cárcel de la ciudad de Birmingham y su discurso “Tengo un sueño”, ambos de 1963. Mientras estaba encarcelado en Birmingham por liderar una protesta no violenta, King respondió a algunos de sus compañeros ministros cristianos que le habían criticado por ir demasiado rápido, esperando que el cambio social se produjera de la noche a la mañana. El ministro bautista respondió a sus…

New bishop-elect: ‘It’s my new home; it’s where I belong’

By Deacon Kyle Eller
The Northern Cross

When a diocesan official asked him when he anticipated coming to the Diocese of Duluth, Bishop-elect Michel J. Mulloy said in a press conference that his first impulse was simple: “tomorrow.”

Bishop-elect Michel Mulloy
Bishop-elect Michel Mulloy addresses the media outside of the diocesan Pastoral Center June 19 after his appointment as the next bishop of Duluth was announced. He currently serves as diocesan administrator for the Diocese of Rapid City, South Dakota. His ordination and installation in Duluth are being planned for Oct. 1. (Photo by Mary Rasch / For The Northern Cross)

While other duties will prevent that immediate move, Bishop-elect Mulloy, currently serving as diocesan administrator for the Diocese of Rapid City, said that once he accepted the call to become the Diocese of Duluth’s next bishop, his heart already began moving here. After only a few hours, he said, he already felt welcome.

“I look forward to meeting everybody,” he said. “I look forward to getting to know the people of this diocese and the priests of this diocese, the deacons of this diocese, because it’s my new home; it’s where I belong. It’s where God has planted me for this part of my life.”

He said moving is something he’s used to, and the hard winters don’t daunt him.

“I learned a long time ago that you learn to love where you are and you learn to be happy where God places you,” he said. “So I’m not worried about that piece at all.”

A South Dakota native

Pope Francis’ appointment of Bishop-elect Mulloy for the Duluth Diocese was announced June 19 in Washington, D.C., by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, the Vatican nuncio to the United States. His episcopal ordination and installation have been set for Oct. 1.

Bishop-elect Mulloy, 67, is a native of Mobridge, South Dakota. He was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, June 8, 1979, and incardinated into the Diocese of Rapid City in 1986 after being on loan to the diocese for a few years for parish ministry.

He was born May 20, 1953, to Silvin and Ethel Mulloy, joining one brother, Colin Dean, and two sisters, Madonna and Roxan. His older brother Llewellen died at birth. He grew up attending St. Joseph Catholic Church and the public school in Mobridge. His dad was a mechanic and car dealer, and his mother cared for the home and assisted her husband with bookkeeping.

In 1967, his mother died of an aneurysm. His father moved with Michel’s brother to Keystone, South Dakota, in the Black Hills in 1968, where he met and married Amelia (Babe) Cordes.

That same year, Michel entered the minor seminary at O’Gorman High School in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, as a sophomore. Michel attended what is now St. Mary’s University of Minnesota and Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona. He graduated in 1975 with a bachelor of arts in classical humanities.

From 1975 to 1979, Michel attended St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul for theology, the archdiocese’s graduate-level seminary, which has graduated 33 other priests later ordained bishops, among them Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, a candidate for sainthood.

After Bishop-elect Mulloy was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Sioux Falls in 1979, he served in parishes in both the Sioux Falls and Rapid City dioceses before being formally incardinated in the Rapid City Diocese. He has served as the Rapid City diocese’s vocations director and director of its Office of Worship. He has also served on its priests’ council, college of consultors, diocesan finance and pastoral councils, and the Sioux Spiritual Center Board of Directors.

In 2017, Bishop-elect Mulloy became the full-time vicar general of the diocese and returned to Rapid City. In 2019, he was elected diocesan administrator when Bishop Robert D. Gruss was named bishop of Saginaw, Michigan.

Bishop-elect Mulloy is close to his immediate family and his extended family with cousins living throughout the country. His brother Colin died in 2003. His father and stepmother also are also deceased. Colin’s two daughters and two granddaughters live in San Diego.

His sister Roxan lives in Rugby, North Dakota. She has two daughters and four grandchildren. His sister Madonna and her husband, Allen, live in Milliken, Colorado. They have two sons and a daughter and 14 grandchildren.

Connections to the Duluth Diocese

Bishop-elect Mulloy will succeed the late Bishop Paul Sirba, who died unexpectedly Dec. 1, 2019, and he said some of his first thoughts after he learned of the new assignment were of the late bishop, whose funeral he had attended.

“When I found out I was going to become the bishop, I went into the chapel in the chancery where I work, and one of the first people that came to my mind was Bishop Sirba,” he said. “And so I said, ‘I need you to help me.’ And I believe he heard that and he will. So I’m also honored to be following in his footsteps, because he truly was a wonderful, holy man.”

There are other connections, too. Father James Bissonette, diocesan administrator for the Diocese of Duluth, who introduced the new bishop-elect at the press conference, said the two of them had recently come to know each other better.

“Because of Bishop Sirba’s untimely death, the two of us went as diocesan administrators with the bishops of the province to Rome together,” Father Bissonette said. “So you might notice I use a cane, and I have cerebral palsy, and I yanked on his arm all the way through Rome last January. So luckily, fortuitously, gracefully, we know each other.”

“We’re very glad to have our bishop-elect, and one of these days we can drop the ‘elect’ and he’ll just be our bishop,” he added.

Bishop-elect Mulloy’s duties as diocesan administrator in the Diocese of Rapid City also bring a connection to Duluth, as that diocese is preparing for the ordination and installation of a Duluth priest, Bishop-elect Peter Muhich, on July 9.

Asked about what in effect works out to be an unusual “swap” between the two dioceses, Bishop-elect Mulloy said, “I think God has an enormous, wonderful sense of humor, that’s what I think.”

“You’re losing a good priest; I hope you’re getting a good one,” he added. “I think we’re getting a good bishop; I hope you’re getting one.”

He described the opportunity for ministry among Native Americans in the Diocese of Duluth another special connection between the two dioceses. The Rapid City Diocese, he said, has one of the largest populations of Native American Catholics in the United States, and there is a cause for canonization for one of them, Nicholas Black Elk, a catechist who led many people to the Catholic faith.

“There’s something very holy about Native American people that I’ve experienced or been around,” he said, adding that he was anxious to get to know the Native Americans in our area.

Reactions

Father Bissonette, in delivering the news to the clergy of the diocese, said Bishop-elect Mulloy brings a wealth of both pastoral and administrative experience, having served in parishes from 1979 to 2017 and having served in many capacities for the Diocese of Rapid City since the late 1980s.

Archbishop Bernard Hebda of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, also welcomed the news.

“I have come to know him in his great work as diocesan administrator of the Diocese of Rapid City and am confident that he will be a faithful servant and shepherd to the people of northeastern Minnesota, building on the ministry of Bishop Paul Sirba,” Archbishop Hebda said.

“I very much look forward to collaborating with him as he joins the bishops of our state,” he added.

In the Diocese of Rapid City, Chancellor Margaret Simonson said in a message to the faithful that Bishop-elect Mulloy had left a legacy there.

“The Lord has blessed this diocese abundantly through Father Mulloy’s priestly ministry,” she wrote. “Throughout his 40 years of priesthood he has been an integral part of our presbyterate and left a faith-filled impression on the parishioners that he served. He will be greatly missed; however, the people of the Diocese of Duluth will gain a faithful and joyful shepherd. Today is a day of great joy for all of us but especially for the people of the Diocese of Duluth.”

Catholic News Service and Maria Weiring of The Catholic Spirit, newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, contributed to this report.

Deacon Kyle Eller: What we need most now is mercy — God’s love where we’re hurting

Mercy — both receiving it and granting it — is among the sweetest of human experiences, and of course it is at the very heart of the Gospel.

Deacon Kyle Eller
Deacon Kyle Eller
Mere Catholicism

The word itself as used in Scripture and in our faith is rich in meaning. We often speak of mercy as a matter of forgiveness of sins, but it is that and more. It’s also the corporal works of mercy, like feeding the hungry and visiting the sick and imprisoned. It’s also the spiritual works of mercy, like counseling the doubtful and comforting those sorrowing and forgiving and bearing wrongs patiently.

God’s mercy for us is like this. That one term embraces his forgiveness of our sins and his meeting of our needs and his caring for us in our distress and his loving presence in our lives. The late Bishop Paul Sirba’s beautiful description of mercy — “God’s love where we’re hurting” — is so beautiful because it enfolds that whole reality in the true context, God’s unfathomable love for us meeting our misery.

Psalm 85, as we pray it in the Liturgy of the Hours, speaks of God’s mercy and saving help this way: “Mercy and faithfulness have met; justice and peace have embraced.”

Who doesn’t treasure the experience of this? When I am finally able to forgive some hurt I’ve experienced, when I receive someone’s forgiveness for a wrong I’ve committed, when I am unexpectedly pulled from “another fine mess” I’ve gotten myself into, when some old grudge is brought out into the open and reconciliation begins, when I finally understand someone’s point of view that had eluded me, when I finally feel like I’m understood, when I’m in need and I learn a friend has been praying for me, when I see someone struggling and lend a hand, and in many similar moments, I experience not just freedom and relief from a suffering alleviated but the joy of God’s loving presence. I really feel touched by his love, with all the gratitude and joy that accompanies it.

These last months have, in an intense way, involved human misery in myriad forms. That should be an invitation. Pope St. John Paul II, in his letter on the Christian meaning of suffering, said there is a vast “world” of suffering with both personal and collective meanings, but which calls for solidarity.

“People who suffer become similar to one another through the analogy of their situation, the trial of their destiny, or through their need for understanding and care, and perhaps above all through the persistent question of the meaning of suffering,” he wrote. “Thus, although the world of suffering exists ‘in dispersion,’ at the same time it contains within itself a singular challenge to communion and solidarity.”

In other words, it calls for mercy, for God’s love where we’re hurting.

Sadly, that seems to be the last thing on many minds. Or if there is mercy, it is too often a cheap mercy, a willingness to forgive and excuse and address the suffering of ourselves and those we already love while reserving none for those perceived as enemies.

In some cases, this may be more or less explicit, where reconciliation and forgiveness are directly repudiated as goals. More often, it’s implicit in the way we act, ascribing the worst possible motives to people based on the smallest deviation from the party line, enforced with public denunciation; online and in-person mobs; and personal, social, economic, and sometimes legal shunning.

More and more, people give no quarter, apparently lacking the humility to entertain the possibility they could make a mistake or the imagination to consider how someone might disagree with them in good faith.

This is not new, of course. One of the parables of Jesus I find most haunting is the unmerciful servant, who is forgiven a massive debt but then goes and attacks a fellow servant who owes him a pittance. It’s such an easy trap to fall into.

But it seems to me that, barring a merciful divine intervention, upon which we have no right to presume but for which we may rightly beg, there is no hopeful future for a society that abandons mercy and reconciliation on a broad scale. How can we go on this way?

Be that as it may, among followers of Jesus, who commanded forgiveness and mercy and love of our enemies, it must not be so. Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the sons of God.

May our little leaven leaven the whole loaf with the mercy we need — God’s love where we’re hurting.

Deacon Kyle Eller is editor of The Northern Cross. Reach him at [email protected].

Why “What are the Bishops Doing About it?” is the Wrong Question

Recently, the bishops of California made a statement regarding the attacks on the statues of St. Junipero Serra in San Francisco, Ventura, and Los Angeles. While acknowledging that there are legitimate concerns about racism both historical and contemporary, we insisted that the characterization of Serra as the moral equivalent of Hitler and the missions he founded as tantamount to death camps is simply unconscionable. I put a link to this statement on my own Word on Fire social media accounts and was gratified to see that many people read it and commented upon it. My purpose in this article is not to examine the specific issues surrounding Padre Serra but rather to respond to a number of remarks in the comboxes that point to what I think is a real failure to understand a key teaching of Vatican II. Over and again, perhaps a hundred times, commentators said some…

Bishop-elect Michel J. Mulloy appointed for Diocese of Duluth

Pope Francis has appointed Father Michel J. Mulloy, from the Diocese of Rapid City, South Dakota, to be the 10th bishop of the Diocese of Duluth, it was announced today.

Bishop-elect Michel Mulloy
Bishop-elect Michel Mulloy

Bishop-elect Mulloy was born May 20, 1953, in Mobridge, South Dakota, and was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1979. He served parishes in both the Sioux Falls and Rapid City dioceses before being incardinated formally in the Rapid City diocese in 1986. He has spent most of his priestly ministry serving in parishes until his appointment full-time as vicar general of the Rapid City Diocese in 2017 and his subsequent election in 2019 as diocesan administrator after Rapid City’s bishop was transfered to another diocese.

Among other roles in the Diocese of Rapid City, Bishop-elect Mulloy has served as vocations director and director of the Office of Worship, as well as serving on the presbyteral council, the College of Consultors, the diocesan finance and pastoral councils, and the Sioux Spiritual Center Board of Directors.

His episcopal ordination and installation have been set for Thursday, Oct. 1.

Bishop-elect Mulloy will succeed the late Bishop Paul Sirba, who died unexpectedly on Dec. 1, 2019.

 

Heart of Jesus, Holy Temple of God

I’ve been reading, recently, a good deal of the work of Dietrich von Hildebrand—perhaps not a household name, but in fact one of the greatest Catholic philosophers of the last century. An inspiration to both John Paul II and Benedict XVI, von Hildebrand was designated by the Nazis themselves as their number one enemy in the 1930s—pretty high praise, that. Hildebrand developed a number path-breaking ideas, including the distinction, foundational for ethics, between the merely subjectively satisfying and the objectively valuable. And he was, perhaps more than any other figure in the twentieth century, the philosopher of the heart. He contended that, though the Western anthropological tradition has placed a great deal of stress on the intellect and the will as spiritual powers, it has, for the most part, ignored or relegated to secondary status the heart, which Hildebrand characterizes as the seat or center of the affective life. Typically,…

Clergy assigments

Father James Bissonette, diocesan administrator, has announced the following clergy assignments, effective (unless otherwise noted) July 15, 2020.

Father Peter Muhich, rector of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Rosary, St. Mary Star of the Sea, and Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth, has been named bishop-elect of the Diocese of Rapid City. He will be installed July 9.

Father Paul Strommer, parochial vicar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Rosary, St. Mary Star of the Sea, and Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth, to administrator of St. Joseph, Chisholm, and Sacred Heart, Buhl.

Father Anthony Wroblewski, pastor of St. Francis, Brainerd; All Saints, Baxter; and St. Thomas of the Pines, Brainerd, to administrator of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Rosary, St. Mary Star of the Sea, and Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth.

Father Ryan Moravitz. pastor of St. Lawrence, Holy Family, and St. Joseph, Duluth, to administrator of St. Francis, Brainerd; All Saints, Baxter; and St. Thomas of the Pines, Brainerd. He remains vocation director.

Father Elias Gieske, pastor of St. Joseph, Crosby; St. Joseph, Deerwood; Holy Family, Hillman; and Our Lady of Fatima, Garrison, to administrator of St. Lawrence, Holy Family, and St. Joseph, Duluth.

Father Anthony Craig, pastor of St. Joseph, Chisholm, and Sacred Heart, Buhl, administrator of St. Joseph, Crosby; St. Joseph, Deerwood; Holy Family, Hillman; and Our Lady of Fatima, Garrison. He remains assistant to the Marriage, Family, and Life Office.

Father Blake Rozier, pastor of Immaculate Heart, Crosslake, and St. Emily, Emily, to administrator of St. Joseph, Grand Rapids, and St. Augustine, Cohasset.

Father Drew Braun, pastor of St. John, Duluth, and St. Joseph, Gnesen, to administrator of Immaculate Heart, Crosslake, and St. Emily, Emily.

Father Seth Gogolin, pastor of St. Joseph, Grand Rapids, and St. Augustine, Cohasset, to administrator of St. John, Duluth, and St. Joseph, Gnesen.

Father Matthew Miller to parochial vicar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Rosary, St. Mary Star of the Sea, and Our Lady of Mercy, Duluth.